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#4HELP RESOURCES
Information about Alcohol Abuse, Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A.) and Al Anon
Alcohol and Health Brochures & Pamphlets

TABLE OF CONTENTS

What is Alcoholics Anonymous?

Alcoholics Anonymous is an international fellowship of men and women who have had a drinking problem. It is nonprofessional, self-supporting, multiracial, apolitical, and available almost everywhere. There are no age or education requirements. Membership is open to anyone who wants to do something about his or her drinking problem.

Click here for list of online A.A. meetings.

What is Al Anon?

 

There is no magic formula that enables you to help someone stop—or cut back—on his or her drinking. Alcoholism is a complex problem, with many related issues. But Al‑Anon can help you learn how to cope with the challenges of someone else’s drinking.

It may be that you could help matters by changing some of your own behaviors that make things worse. It may be possible for you to find a healthier way to respond to these challenges. Again, there are no easy answers.  But Al‑Anon meetings offer the opportunity to learn from the experiences of others who have faced similar problems.

While simple problems may have simple solutions, the solution to complex problems is more difficult to explain. Al‑Anon simplifies a complex problem by suggesting a “One Day at a Time” approach, which takes things one step at a time.

At every Al‑Anon meeting, you can hear people explain how Al‑Anon worked for them. That may be the best place to start to learn about Al‑Anon—One Day at a Time.

 

Al‑Anon members come to understand problem drinking as a family illness that affects everyone in the family. By listening to Al‑Anon members speak at Al‑Anon meetings, you can hear how they came to understand their own role in this family illness. This insight put them in a better position to play a positive role in the family’s future.

 

Some research shows that when problem drinkers enter a recovery program, their chances for success are improved when they are supported by family members who are in a family recovery program such as Al‑Anon.

Alcohol Data, Brochures and PDFs 

     Alcohol Use Disorder     
     Alcohol Facts and Statistics      
     Alcohol and the Hispanic Community      
     Drinking and Your Pregnancy      
     Interrupted Memories: Alcohol-Induced Blackouts     
     Understanding Alcohol’s Impact on Health      
     College Drinking     
     College - Fall Semester and Drinking      
     Fetal Alcohol Syndrome     
     Hangovers     

Thank you to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism for Sharing Their Work with Us